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Com-HAC 2018 Steering Committee: Stephanie Carter, Jilda Lazer, Mohamed Badsha, Rachel Solomon, Jennifer Wilkie (From Left to Right)

Read why the conference committee is excited about the potential of data and learning more at Com-HAC 2018

 

Q&A with Rachel Solomon, Executive Director of Performance Improvement, CAMH

What do you see in the power of data?


To me, data is powerful because it forces us to look beyond our own professional and personal experiences and challenges our assumptions. When we measure the right things and examine the data critically, patterns emerge. We get ideas about what we might not have noticed or solutions we had never contemplated. Data never gives the whole picture, but it provides important clues as to how it fits together.




Where do you see data being used really well?


When they are designed well, I still get impressed by companies with Recommendation Engines such as Amazon and Netflix. The idea that my recommended booklist is constantly being refined with data gleaned from every book I purchase or rate still excites me.

From a health care perspective, I‘m excited by what is happening across the United States and Europe within “learning health system” models. Organizations are using their data to trial interventions, evaluate them, adjust and iterate, re-evaluate, and bring them rapidly into practice. This shrinks the time it usually takes from an idea being proven through traditional research to becoming embedded in practice – and incorporates a broader, more powerful sample size!




Where do you see the opportunities to elevate data in health care? In the community sector?


There is a great opportunity to use data to actually make change. We spend a lot of time dissecting data and not as much trying new things that might make an impact.

Another opportunity is in examining non-traditional sources of data for insight. In addition to structured surveys, we can also learn a lot about patient input from complimentary information such as yelp reviews, ratemds or user apps. The data from non-health care sources – housing, justice, education – can also give us insights into the health of the populations we serve.

Most importantly, we also need to stop waiting for data to be perfect. A small set of data across a system and across time can tell a big story. Putting it out there – transparently – often creates a lot of change.




Why are you looking forward to Com-HAC 2018?


CAMH works closely with partners across the health care system, and greatly values its relationship with the community. Participating in this event not only gives me a chance to learn more about the potential of data and technology outside of my own hospital, but allows me to be a better partner to organizations by learning about the innovations and challenges emerging in the community sector.





How have you seen the use of technology advance the community sector?


Technology is one of the key elements enabling connectivity and promoting integration between the community sector and the rest of the health care system. Specifically, in primary and acute care. The net result of a truly integrated system is coordinated care and ease of access to information for both clients/patients and providers.

The community sector is on a maturity model trajectory as we speak. To date community sector providers are submitting data to a centralized business intelligence (CBI) repository in the Toronto Central LHIN, increasing participation with digital connectivity data centres such as Connecting Ontario, uploading assessment data to the Integrated Assessment Record (IAR), starting to use sophisticated decision support solutions and exploring and implementing client portals.




How will technology further support the work of integrating community care?


Technology is the most effective way for coordinating care in a seamless way. It can help distribute the accountability of care to all stakeholders and also involve the client or patient in their care in real time. Technology can expedite communication and enhance service care planning and also offers enhanced opportunities for collaboration.




How has the sector’s slow uptake held us back? And where do you see the most potential?


The playing field for the community sector is uneven when compared to the rest of the health system. This is evident now as the system and clients are demanding coordinated care between the community sector and primary care. In my view, the most potential and opportunities for success using technology is in the transitions of care.




What are you most looking forward to at Com-HAC 2018?


I’m looking forward to learning about how technology can support alignment, integration and seamless care in the community sector. The prospect of technology in the hands of clients and patients is exciting. Also, the ways we can leverage data mining and predictive analysis into planning. There are so many opportunities to advance and innovate using technology in the community.





Q&A with Mohamed Badsha, Chief Executive Officer, Reconnect Community Health Services

How have you seen the use of technology advance the community sector?


Technology is one of the key elements enabling connectivity and promoting integration between the community sector and the rest of the health care system. Specifically, in primary and acute care. The net result of a truly integrated system is coordinated care and ease of access to information for both clients/patients and providers.

The community sector is on a maturity model trajectory as we speak. To date community sector providers are submitting data to a centralized business intelligence (CBI) repository in the Toronto Central LHIN, increasing participation with digital connectivity data centres such as Connecting Ontario, uploading assessment data to the Integrated Assessment Record (IAR), starting to use sophisticated decision support solutions and exploring and implementing client portals.




How will technology further support the work of integrating community care?


Technology is the most effective way for coordinating care in a seamless way. It can help distribute the accountability of care to all stakeholders and also involve the client or patient in their care in real time. Technology can expedite communication and enhance service care planning and also offers enhanced opportunities for collaboration.




How has the sector’s slow uptake held us back? And where do you see the most potential?


The playing field for the community sector is uneven when compared to the rest of the health system. This is evident now as the system and clients are demanding coordinated care between the community sector and primary care. In my view, the most potential and opportunities for success using technology is in the transitions of care.




What are you most looking forward to at Com-HAC 2018?


I’m looking forward to learning about how technology can support alignment, integration and seamless care in the community sector. The prospect of technology in the hands of clients and patients is exciting. Also, the ways we can leverage data mining and predictive analysis into planning. There are so many opportunities to advance and innovate using technology in the community.





Com-HAC May 12th, 2020
The Globe and Mail Centre

351 King Street East, Suite 1700

Toronto, ON M5A 0N1

 
 
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